A Portfolio of Questions from LSC Webinars 2010-2015

Problem-solving: Planning Toward Substantive, Sustainable Transformation of the Undergraduate Learning Environment

From the beginning, the LSC has focused on questioning as a powerful tool for planning. In our early discussions, we identified four essential questions to drive the planning process. The LSC Guide is structured around these questions: Š What do we want our students to become Š What experiences make that becoming happen? Š What spaces enable such experiences? Š How do we know?

Questions about “the most audacious question” have been woven into various LSC conversations in recent years. As noted by John Ruskin, we believe that… To be able to ask a question clearly is two-thirds of the way to getting it answered. Why tackle planning as problem solving:

[Problem solving] …is required whenever there is a goal to reach and attainment of that goal is not possible either by direct action or by retrieving a sequence of previously learning steps from memory. That is, during problem solving the path to the intended goal is uncertain. (National Research Council. Discipline-Based Education Research: Understanding and Improving Learning in Undergraduate Science and Engineering. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2012.)

Why understanding problem-solving as an experience in social creativity:

The power of the unaided individual mind is highly overrated. Much human creativity is social, arising from activities that take place in a social context in which interaction with other people and the artifacts that embody collective knowledge are essential contributors. (Fischer, Gerhard. “Social Creativity: Making All Voices Heard.” University of Colorado, Center for LifeLong Learning and Design. http://l3d.cs.colorado.edu/~gerhard/papers/social-creativity-hcii-2005.pdf)
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The portfolio of questions extracted and distilled from LSC webinars is designed as a resource and prompt for those responsible for the physical learning environment—be it a single, one-time project or as part of strategic thinking about the institutional future. Further details and resources are included on the end.

http://pkallsc.org/assets/images/Iowa%20State%20Classrooms%202.jpg
(Iowa State University Aerospace Engineering Classroom)

From the beginning, the LSC has focused on questioning as a powerful tool for planning. In our early discussions, we identified four essential questions to drive the planning process. The LSC Guide is structured around these questions:

  • What do we want our students to become
  • What experiences make that becoming happen?
  • What spaces enable such experiences?
  • How do we know?

http://pkallsc.org/assets/images/NKU-DisputeMediationClass.jpg
(Northern Kentucky University Griffin Hall Center for Informatics)

Questions about “the most audacious question” have been woven into various LSC conversations in recent years. As noted by John Ruskin, we believe that… To be able to ask a question clearly is two-thirds of the way to getting it answered. Why tackle planning as problem solving: 

[Problem solving] …is required whenever there is a goal to reach and attainment of that goal is not possible either by direct action or by retrieving a sequence of previously learning steps from memory. That is, during problem solving the path to the intended goal is uncertain. (National Research Council. Discipline-Based Education Research: Understanding and Improving Learning in Undergraduate Science and Engineering. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2012.)

Why understanding problem-solving as an experience in social creativity:

The power of the unaided individual mind is highly overrated. Much human creativity is social, arising from activities that take place in a social context in which interaction with other people and the artifacts that embody collective knowledge are essential contributors. (Fischer, Gerhard. “Social Creativity: Making All Voices Heard.” University of Colorado, Center for LifeLong Learning and Design. http://l3d.cs.colorado.edu/~gerhard/papers/social-creativity-hcii-2005.pdf

http://pkallsc.org/assets/images/UMN%20Cropped.png
(University of Minnesota Active Learning Classroom)

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The portfolio of questions extracted and distilled from LSC webinars is designed as a resource and prompt for those responsible for the physical learning environment—be it a single, one-time project or as part of strategic thinking about the institutional future. Further details and resources are included on the end. 

http://pkallsc.org/assets/images/Duke%20University%20-%20A%20Portfolio%20of%20Questions%20from%20LSC%20Webinars%202010-2015.jpg

http://pkallsc.org/assets/images/UMBC%20-%20A%20Portfolio%20of%20Questions%20from%20LSC%20Webinars%202010-2015.jpg

Read more: A Portfolio of Questions from LSC Webinars (2010 – 2015) >>>