Focusing on the Future of Learning Spaces – The LSC Perspective: A Brown Bag Lunch at NSF

Thursday, May 4, 2017

May 4, 2017

Facilitators:

  • Susan Albertine, Senior Scholar, Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) and Committee Member, Integrating Higher Education in the Arts, Humanities, Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Project, National Academies
  • Robert Beichner, Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor of Physics and Director of the NCSU STEM Education Initiative - North Carolina State University
  • David F. Brakke, Dean and Professor Emeritus, College of Science and Mathematics - James Madison University
  • Linda Hodges, Associate Vice Provost for Faculty Affairs, Director, Faculty Development Center - University of Maryland, Baltimore County
  • Kevin Johnson, Principal - SmithGroupJJR
  • Jeanne L. Narum, Principal - Learning Spaces Collaboratory and Founding Director, Project Kaleidoscope (PKAL)
  • Laura Ott, Director, Science Education Research Unit, College of Natural and Mathematical Sciences - University of Maryland, Baltimore County
  • Robin Wright, Head, Department of Biology Teaching and Learning and Editor-in-Chief, CourseSource - University of Minnesota

The LSC will develop a packet of materials from 2016 and 2017 Roundtables that illustrate how priorities of the Division of Undergraduate Education at NSF- engaged student learning and institutional and community transformation- are served by attention to planning the physical environment for 21st century learners:

NSF Program Solicitation: NSF 15-585

Priorities include educating students to be leaders and innovators in emerging and rapidly changing STEM fields as well as educating a scientifically literate populace. Both of these priorities depend on the nature and quality of the undergraduate education experience.

The impact of spaces on learning will be illustrated by photos from the architectural portfolios that are part of the Roundtable experience.

Presentation: The Planning of Spaces for Learning - Past, Present, and Future